02
March 2021

THE NORTHERN POWERHOUSE

Welcome to our Arts Society!
Tuesday, March 2, 2021 - 13:45

Illustrating how pioneering transport networks created the Northern Powerhouse

Transport historian Mark Ovenden demonstrates that the driver of the early Northern Powerhouse was its pioneering transportation: the first modern canals (Bridgewater), first inter-city railways (Liverpool-Manchester), first buses (Salford), first tram (Birkenhead), first Motorway (Preston by-pass).  Illustrated by contemporary art and photography Mark shows hows how the north has always been at the forefront of new technology.  This gave a competitive advantage over other areas, building trade with North America and the world via Liverpool docks and the industrial heartlands of Lancashire and Cheshire. 

THE ARTS SOCIETY ACCREDITED LECTURER

Mr Mark Ovenden

Mark Ovenden is a broadcaster and author who specialises in the subjects of graphic design, cartography and architecture in public transport, with an emphasis on underground rapid transit.

His first book Metro Maps of the World published in 2003 is a guide to the diagrams, plans and maps of underground rapid transit system including images ranging from photos of the systems to rare and historical maps. Paris Metro Style in map and station design was published November 2008. Railway Maps of the World was published in May 2011 in the USA, a British edition was produced in September 2011. London Underground by Design was published by Penguin Books in January 2013. A celebration of the Johnston typeface centenary and 90th Anniversary of Gill Sans was published in 2016, and in July 2017 Mark fronted a television documentary for BBC Four on the subject of Johnston and Gill and in November 2018 he presented a documentary for BBC Radio 4 on skyscrapers. Others works on graphic design and transport systems are in preparation.

..................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................... Just 30 years separate these two landscape paintings yet the difference between a rural idyl and an industrial urban sprawl could not be more stark. The first painting by Sebastian Pether in 1820 shows a view towards what was then the small town of Manchester from Kersal Moor in Salford. The second painted from the same vantage point by William Wyld in 1852 portrays the rapacious expansion of the worlds first industrial city.